Ever Wanted to Bathe in Bonnard’s Tub? See Famous Bathrooms From Art History as They May Have Really Looked

A bathroom retailer has brought to life scenes from six famous paintings.

Edvard Munch, Marat in the Bath and Charlotte Corday(1930). Courtesy Munch Museum via QS Supplies.
Edvard Munch, Marat in the Bath and Charlotte Corday(1930). Courtesy Munch Museum via QS Supplies.

Many art history buffs enjoy seeking out the scenes of famous paintings in real life—from Giverny, which inspired Monet’s water lilies, to the Arles café where Van Gogh set his Café Terrace at NightBut there are other places you must be content visiting only in your mind’s eye, such as intimate indoor settings, which, if they were even real in the first place, have long since been re-modeled.

These interior spaces have been nearly impossible to see, that is, until now. In a very specific stroke of marketing genius (that may or may not have struck someone while in the shower), bathroom retailers QS Supplies have taken it upon themselves to imagine what the bathrooms from six famous paintings would look like in real life. 

Using their own materials and skills in digital rendering, the company has brought to life the bathrooms imagined by the likes of Pierre Bonnard, Edvard Munch, and Fernando Botero in full, sparkling, splendor—see them here.

Perkins Harnly
Bathroom (1935)

Courtesy QS Supplies.

Courtesy QS Supplies.

 

Fernando Botero
The Bathroom (1995)

Courtesy QS Supplies.

Courtesy QS Supplies.

 

Roy Lichtenstein
Bathroom (1961)

Courtesy QS Supplies.

Courtesy QS Supplies.

 

Carl Larsson
Bathroom Scene—Lisbeth (1909)

Courtesy QS Supplies.

 

Edvard Munch
Marat in the Bath and Charlotte Corday (1930)

Courtesy QS Supplies.

Courtesy QS Supplies.

 

Pierre Bonnard
Nude in Bath (1925)

Courtesy QS Supplies.

Courtesy QS Supplies.


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